DISCOVER THE ISSUES

Gentrification and Affordable Housing

Gentrification provokes considerable debate and controversy over how it affects neighborhoods and the people residing in them. The term is often used to describe neighborhood changes that are characterized by an influx of new residents of a higher socioeconomic status relative to incumbent residents, causing rising housing values--and rising costs. While many associate gentrification with residential displacement, the empirical evidence on the relationship between gentrification and residential displacement is not conclusive, as research finds no significant evidence of higher mobility rates among existing vulnerable residents in gentrifying neighborhoods nor does it explain the dynamics of residential mobility in gentrifying neighborhoods. How should we think about how to ensure that neighborhoods are safe and have desirable amenities without displacing long-term residents and businesses? Can there be reinvestment or external investment in a neighborhood without gentrification or displacement--and what would that look like?

Details and Resources Coming Soon

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Kelly Anderson

Kelly Anderson is an award-winning independent producer, director, and editor of documentary and narrative films/videos and a Professor in the Department of Film and Media Studies at Hunter College (CUNY).

Kelly’s documentaries include My Brooklyn (www.mybrooklynmovie.com) about the redevelopment of Downtown Brooklyn, which premiered at the Brooklyn Film Festival and was broadcast on the PBS World series America ReFramed. She also was the Producer and Director (with Tami Gold) of Every Mother’s Son, a film three mothers were sons were killed by law enforcement and became national spokespeople for police reform. Kelly is the author (with Marty Lucas) of Documentary Voice & Vision: a creative approach to non-fiction media production (Focal Press, 2016) and she recently recieved the George C. Stoney Award for Outstanding Documentary from the University Film and Video Association.

POST SESSION WRAP-UP

Roosevelt House, NY
March 4, 2018

SPEAKER(S):

Kelly Anderson,
Associate Professor

Gentrification provokes considerable debate and controversy over how it affects neighborhoods and the people residing in them. The term is often used to describe neighborhood changes that are characterized by an influx of new residents of a higher socioeconomic status relative to incumbent residents, causing rising housing values--and rising costs.

Video of the conference

CONFERENCE PODCAST

Background resources on Gentrification and Affordable Housing

Is Gentrification Really a Problem?

New Yorker | July 2016

What the American ghetto reveals about the ethics and economics of changing neighborhoods

Read the article

The Myth of Gentrification

Slate | Jan 2015

It’s extremely rare and not as bad for the poor as you think.

Read the article

Growing Up in a Bad Neighborhood Does More Harm Than We Thought

NY Times | March 2016

Read the article

In the Shadow of Gentrification

The Brooklyn Rail | Oct 2014

Read the article

Don’t Blame the Gentrifiers

Slate | Aug 2017

Read the article